How hybrid working can promote employee mental health and increase retention

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As an HR manager, recruiting the best talent is becoming more and more difficult. Today’s job market is candidate-driven, so employers need to increase their offers to recruit potential employees.

However, today’s candidates are not just looking for competitive compensation; they seek competitive advantages. And the advantages of today are not the advantages of yesteryear. It is no longer just about health, dental care and paid holidays.

Since the pandemic, benefit expectations have changed dramatically. Most candidates want an employer who values ​​mental health, work-life balance, and a positive work culture that prioritizes these things over the proverbial “grit”.

Understanding hybrid work schedules

A hybrid work schedule is one of the most sought-after benefits by candidates. Hybrid working, where employees spend part of their workweek in the office and the rest working remotely, can vary widely from organization to organization. Some even let the employee decide what their hybrid work schedule will look like. Offering a hybrid work schedule to your employees gives candidates the flexibility to create the work-life balance they desire.

A recent Accenture report found that 63% of high-growth companies have already enabled hybrid workforce models where employees have the option of working remotely or onsite.

Almost 70% of companies with negative or no growth are spending even more time where people will be physically working, favoring an all-on-site or all-remote model over a hybrid model. Another interesting finding from the report is that 40% of workers found they could be more productive and healthier when working with a hybrid model.

Debra Boggs, MSM, job search consultant and resume writer at D&S Professional Coaching, said in a recent interview by Forbes.com that “remote flexibility is essential for many employers to compete for the best candidates”.

Candidates are looking for a job where they are trusted to get the job done rather than following strict work schedules. They want their actual job performance assessed, not the number of hours they spend in the office.

Benefits of a hybrid work schedule

One of the biggest benefits of a hybrid model is that people can work when (and where) they are most productive. They are not constrained to a 9 to 5 work schedule. Not only can employees work when they are at the peak of their productivity, but you will also get greater productivity from your employees overall.

A hybrid work schedule can also reduce work-related stressors, such as commute times and trying to schedule personal affairs around rigid work hours. For example, a recent investigation conducted by Salesforce said 59% of workers felt a hybrid working model contributed positively to their psychological well-being as they could take care of personal business without the pressure of rigid work schedules.

Another benefit of this particular work model is the ability to take breaks when needed. Employees are not limited to a particular break rotation or a certain time for their break. According to recent studies, when workers can take breaks throughout the daytheir overall performance, job satisfaction and mental health increase.

Hybrid work models also allow for more social time. Being around loved ones increases happiness, which then results in higher performing employees.

How to set up a hybrid work schedule

How you embrace a hybrid work schedule depends on your people and the processes and technology available to you. Here are some things you can do to get started:

  1. Survey your employees about their needs and wants
  2. Consider what infrastructure should be in place to establish a hybrid model
  3. Determine how you will maintain corporate culture with a hybrid model

The data is undeniable. A hybrid work model not only proves to be more efficient, but is what candidates look for the most in a job opportunity. You can find the right hybrid model for your organization with a little thought and support.

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